Venezuelan Refugee Assistance Act: IN SEARCH OF A LEGAL STATUS

resident

This Bill intends to benefit those Venezuelans who remain unlawfully in the United States, and many of whom even have a deportation order

Edda Pujadas, @epujadas

Para leer en Español

When was the last time that a native of Caracas walked freely through the streets of that city? Holding their purse strongly and keeping a fast pace while walking to avoid being a victim of insecurity became common routines of the inhabitants of Caracas and the rest of the country, yet the worst is that Venezuelans have being forced to forget they even have human rights.

Human rights are based on the principle of respect towards the individual, and the fundamental premise that every person is a moral and rational being who deserves to be treated with dignity. These rights are universal and based on the rights of each person, no matter who that person is or where he or she lives, simply because that person is alive.

Without human rights you are unable to develop or exercise your personal qualities, intelligence, talent or spirituality in full, and it is evident that during the post-Chavez era and now along the Maduro era, Venezuelans have lost their human rights.

They have lost their human rights because they no longer have freedom of speech, the right of being properly fed due to food scarcity, or the right to walk freely throughout the cities due to the serious insecurity that characterizes this South American nation, where the number of weekly violent deaths is similar to that of countries in war.

They also lack the right to have decent shelter as the economic crisis has made it almost impossible for Venezuelans to purchase a home. The same happens with the right to develop professionally or even aspiring a long life, in a country collapsed by corruption and abuse of power in the hands of those self proclaimed “defenders of the people”.

And it is precisely with the idea of restoring the human rights of many Venezuelans that a group of congress representatives proposed a bill to facilitate the legal status of Venezuelans in the United States, it is known as the Venezuelan Refugee Assistance Act, promoted by republican congressman Carlos Curbelo.

This project also has the support of republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen and democrats Alan Grayson and Debbie Wasserman Schultz, all from the State of Florida. Even though the path to pass this bill is long and complex there are good expectations as democrats and republicans alike support the proposal.

The promoters of this bill claim that Venezuelans migrating to the United States are escaping from a very serious economic, political and social situation in their country. Congressman Curbelo supports his proposal on the basis of this crisis, for he claims, “we can’t force Venezuelans to return to a country where they face arrest, torture and execution only because they oppose the Government”.

This proposal, H.R. 3744 known as the Venezuelan Refugee Assistance Act, initially seeks to provide a Temporary Protection Status for Venezuelans who arrived to the United States before January 1st 2013, who do not posses criminal records and who have not taken part on any violation of human rights.

This protection would include Venezuelans who already have deportation orders, but have not committed any crime. The final objective of this project is that the Venezuelan citizens who are protected under this law may become permanent residents of the United States.

The Venezuelan Refugee Assistance Act approval is a long process, which may last one, or two years, as it has to be passed by the Judicial Commission of the Chamber of Representatives and in case of a positive outcome, it has to be voted upon the full Chamber.

Several members in exile such as Ernesto Ackerman and José Antonio Colina promoted this bill.

José Colina
José Colina

Colina, believes the bill has high possibilities of being passed for it is simple and does not have legal complications that would make it difficult for congress representatives to understand. “The important thing is that it is supported by representatives of both parties, two republicans and two democrats, among them, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, who is chair of the National Democrat Committee. I believe this fact gives us great advantage for the approval of a law that seeks to protect Venezuelans. ”

One of the most controversial subjects regarding this bill is the limited timeframe (January 1st. 2013), Colina pointed out that he ignores the reasons why the congress representatives chose this timeframe, yet he considers it is rather ample.

“Lets remember that the idea is to protect those Venezuelans who live illegally in the United States, and I also believe that after 2013 there were even more migratory options available, such as political asylum, professional skills, work and investment certifications, among others, nevertheless the person who arrived and stayed illegally, has no mechanism to achieve a legal status”, explained Colina.

Ernesto Ackerman shares Colina’s opinions, and adds that “it is not written in stone and therefore it may be modified. We are working under a schedule in a coordinated manner to achieve the passing of this bill, but we have a long road ahead of us, and this is just the beginning”.

“The most important thing is the support of the Venezuelan community itself. In the United States there are approximately 250 thousand Venezuelans, if each one of them convinces 10 people to support this project we are talking about 2 and a half million people in American soil in favor of defending the human rights of Venezuelans”, claimed Ackerman.

… AND WHAT DO VENEZUELANS IN MIAMI HAVE TO SAY

Sonia Osorio
Sonia Osorio

Sonia Osorio is a Venezuelan reporter who arrived to the United States at age 18, and who sees this bill with prudence and caution. “Every bill that helps my fellow Venezuelans is a good initiative, but we have to be clear that it has not been approved yet, and therefore it isn’t a valid benefit”.

“I know people who have approached me asking: where can I apply? Those desperate Venezuelans are prone to become victims of criminal persons who offer to legalize their status, under a law that hasn’t been approved yet and that would be terrible”.

Antonia AriasAntonia Arias is a medical radiologist and after retiring, she moved to Miami three years ago. She believes this law is going to rescue the human rights of those who are experiencing great sadness for being born in a great country, which during its days of glory welcomed thousands of European, Colombian and Cuban immigrants, and it is now in ruins.

“The only doubt I have regarding this bill is the timeframe of the benefit. Today, we’re almost concluding 2015, and the situation is even worst than in previous years, the political harassment, corruption and violation of human rights is a horrible situation that Venezuelans in our country are still undergoing”.

Gaby Díaz
Gaby Díaz

Gaby Díaz, a real estate contract administrator, who has lived in the United States for over 15 years, shares this opinion. “I agree that there should be a law to protect the Venezuelans who have moved to this country running from a nation that doesn’t respect the human rights of its citizens. The important thing is that the law in question must legalize the migratory status of these people, either through permanent residency or by means of a temporary protection status that gives them the opportunity to rebuild their lives”.

“Nevertheless, I still don’t understand why the bill only benefits those Venezuelans who arrived to this country before January 1st, 2013, when it is precisely during the last years, since Nicolás Maduro took over the presidency, that the economic, political and social crisis has increased dramatically”, she explained, and added, “definitely Venezuelans are following this bill closely and we hope it is passed soon”.

Wahbi Tahhan
Wahbi Tahhan

Wahbi Tahhan, who is a real estate agent and has lived in Miami for over five years, believes this project should be analyzed from two perspectives. “I believe, that if approved, this bill would help many Venezuelans who haven’t been able to solve their migratory situation due to economic difficulties and this is a completely positive aspect”.

“But I’m worried that the individual cases won’t be evaluated before receiving this benefit. It’s not enough to have no criminal records in order to obtain a legal status in this nation, you also need to respect the culture and lifestyle. Sadly many fellow Venezuelans are here expecting this country to adapt to them instead of them adapting the United States laws. We can see this fact exemplified in Doral’s traffic, where the abuses we have been running away from our country have now become evident in our city. I believe this law should protect those Venezuelans who are here trying to rebuild their lives with dignity and respect”.

Jacqueline DaConceicao
Jacqueline DaConceicao

Jacqueline DaConceicao, who is an administrator and has been living in Miami for four years, is also prudent towards the application of this resource. “I believe that they should evaluate every case of a Venezuelan wanting to benefit from this law individually, because we definitely can’t allow the legal violations that take place in our country to be committed in this nation which is taking us in”.

“I support the legal immigration of Venezuelans to Florida, but it is important to consider their true intentions, if they are really here to build an honest and respectable life. Logically, we should benefit those Venezuelans who are here to work and seek a better future, but not those who expect to bring the old bad ways and vices which ruined Venezuela”.

Elias Kasabdji
Elias Kasabdji

Elías Kasabdji, a Venezuelan businessman who has lived in Miami for six years but still suffers the Venezuelan reality due to his frequent trips to the home country, strongly supports this bill. “This would be a window for those who had to escape the crisis in our country but have no legal option to remain in the United States”.

“On one hand, it would help many fellow Venezuelans who were kidnaped, threatened or even lost a family member to crime, and who despite having economic resources haven’t been able to obtain a legal migratory status in the United States. On the other hand, it would also help those who left Venezuela seeking a better future but lack the economic resources needed to start a legal migratory process”.

Blanca Lindo
Blanca Lindo

“You can’t live in Venezuela”. With these strong words, Blanca Lindo, a Venezuelan businesswoman that has lived in Miami for three years, expresses her support to the Venezuelan Refugee Assistance Act, which she considers an alternative to protect the lives of those who had to run from their native country. “The Venezuelans who left our country didn’t do it by choice, we were forced by the precarious situation that our country has experienced for several years. We have the right to have a new opportunity and provide a better life and future to our children, who also have the right to grow as professionals and as decent people”.

Norah Lossada
Norah Lossada

Norah Lossada is a publicist and has lived in the United States for 16 years. She believes there is no law in Venezuela, or human rights. She specifically referred to the deportation cases “I think it’s criminal to send someone back to Venezuela, because our country is no longer a country it’s a place that has no freedom or respect”.

“This so called governments have done what ever they want with our country and they have forced us to leave, so I believe it’s only fair, to start a process that would provide legal status to the thousands of people who are here illegally, allowing them to resolve their migratory situation, and thus contribute much more to the United States”.

Antonio Malave
Antonio Malave

Antonio Malavé a financial manager, who has lived in Miami for the last five years also strongly supports the bill, “The fact is that you can’t live in Venezuela anymore. I am Venezuelan, my family is Venezuelan and now I’m here because we want to live decently, just as many others who haven’t been able to solve their migratory situation but still seek a decent life”.

“The Venezuelan reality is socially, politically and even financially unbearable, as the value of the US Dollar compared to the Bolivar has reached levels so high and unstoppable that it has become impossible to maintain a stable financial system in Venezuela and the direct victims are the citizens who, in face of a lack of alternatives, have no other option but to run from their place of origin”.

Luis-Riquezes
Luis-Riquezes

Luis Riquezes has been in Miami for 16 years Miami, where he works as a construction manager for several real estate projects and despite regretting the terrible situation undergone by his fellow Venezuelans, he believes this bill should be considered with caution. “They should evaluate in detail who are they going to legalize”.

“It is true that there are thousands of illegal Venezuelans in the United States trying to seek a new life opportunity, but it’s also true that there are many “vivacious characters”, as we call them in Venezuela, who look at this bill as a way of solving a migratory situation, without being willing to adapt to the lifestyle and laws of this nation. I believe they should be very careful with this”.

 

————– En Español ————–

resident

LEY DE ASISTENCIA A REFUGIADOS VENEZOLANOS:

EN BUSCA DE UN ESTATUS LEGAL

 

Este proyecto de ley pretende beneficiar a los venezolanos que permanecen ilegalmente en Estados Unidos, muchos de los cuales, incluso, tienen orden de deportación

 

Edda Pujadas, @epujadas

¿Cuándo fue la última vez que un caraqueño caminó con libertad por las calles de su ciudad? Agarrar con fuerza la cartera, llevar el paso apurado para evitar ser víctima de la inseguridad se volvió tan cotidiano que se hizo costumbre en Caracas y en la mayoría de las ciudades de Venezuela, hasta el punto de hacer que los venezolanos, incluso olviden que tienen derechos humanos.

Los derechos humanos se basan en el principio de respeto por el individuo. Su suposición fundamental es que cada persona es un ser moral y racional que merece que lo traten con dignidad. Son universales y se basan en los derechos que cada persona posee, sin importar quién es o dónde vive, simplemente porque está vivo.

Sin los derechos humanos no se puede cultivar ni ejercer plenamente las cualidades, la inteligencia, talento y espiritualidad del individuo y es evidente, que en la era post-chavista y ahora, madurista, los venezolanos han perdido sus derechos humanos.

Han perdido sus derechos humanos porque no pueden expresarse libremente, porque no tienen libertad de alimentación debido a la escasez de productos básicos y porque no tienen libertad de movimiento por la fuerte inseguridad que atraviesa la nación suramericana, donde el número de muertes violentas semanales es similar al de países en medio de conflictos bélicos.

Ernesto Ackerman
Ernesto Ackerman

Tampoco hay derecho a una vivienda digna porque la crisis económica ha hecho que tener una casa propia sea poco menos que un sueño inalcanzable, al igual que desarrollarse profesionalmente o tan siquiera aspirar a tener una vida digna, en un país colapsado por la corrupción y el abuso de poder de quienes se hicieron llamar “defensores del pueblo”.

Y es justamente en el rescate a los derechos humanos de muchos venezolanos que se basaron los congresistas que presentaron la propuesta de ley que permitiría facilitar el estatus legal de los venezolanos en Estados Unidos, denominada Ley de Asistencia a Refugiados Venezolanos, impulsada por el congresista republicano Carlos Curbelo.

Este proyecto cuenta con el apoyo de la también republicana Ileana Ros-Lehtinen y de los demócratas Alan Grayson y Debbie Wasserman Schultz, todos pertenecientes al estado de la Florida. Aunque el trabajo para lograr la aprobación de esta ley es largo y complejo hay buenas expectativas porque la propuesta es apoyada por demócratas y republicanos.

El argumento de los promotores de esta ley es que los venezolanos que emigran a Estados Unidos están escapando a la grave situación económica, política y social que atraviesa esta nación. En esta crisis se apoyan las declaraciones ofrecidas por el congresista Curbelo al momento de la presentación de su propuesta, las cuales indican que “no podemos forzar a los venezolanos a regresar a un país donde enfrenten arresto, tortura y ejecución solo porque se oponen al Gobierno”.

Esta propuesta, H.R. 3744 y denominada Ley de Asistencia a Refugiados Venezolanos, busca, inicialmente, un Estatus de Protección Temporal (TPS, por sus siglas en inglés) para los venezolanos que hayan llegado a suelo estadounidense antes del 1ero. de enero de 2013, que no posean antecedentes penales y que no hayan participado en actos de violación a los derechos humanos.

La protección incluiría a venezolanos que ya tienen órdenes de deportación, pero que no hayan cometido delitos. El fin último de este proyecto es que los ciudadanos de Venezuela que puedan ser amparados por esta ley reciban la residencia permanente en Estados Unidos.

José Colina
José Colina

Ahora, la aprobación de la Ley de Asistencia a Refugiados Venezolanos es un proceso largo que puede durar de uno a dos años, pues debe pasar por la Comisión Judicial de la Cámara de Representantes y en caso de obtener el visto bueno, pasaría a ser votada en el pleno.

Varios miembros del exilio como Ernesto Ackerman y José Antonio Colina impulsaron este proyecto de ley.

Colina, considera que la propuesta tiene altas probabilidades de aprobación porque es sencilla y no tiene vericuetos legales que la haga difícil de comprender para los congresistas. “Lo más importante es que cuenta con el apoyo bipartidista, dos republicanos y dos demócratas, entre ellos, Debbie Wasserman Schultz, quien es Presidenta del Comité Nacional Demócrata. Yo creo que esto nos da una alta probabilidad de aprobación de una ley que busca proteger a los venezolanos”.

Con respecto a uno de los tópicos que más duda ha generado en relación a esta propuesta que es la fecha límite de este beneficio (1ero. de enero del 2013), Colina señaló que si bien desconoce los motivos exactos de los congresistas para indicar este rango de tiempo, considera que es un margen bastante amplio.

“Recordemos que la idea es amparar a los venezolanos que ya están aquí ilegalmente y también creo que, después del 2013, se han abierto mayores opciones migratorias como asilo político, habilidades profesionales, certificaciones laborales o inversiones, sin embargo, el que ya está aquí y se quedó ilegal, no tiene ningún mecanismo para legalizarse”, señaló Colina.

Las opiniones de Colina son compartidas por Ernesto Ackerman, quien aclaró que esta propuesta “no está escrita en piedra y que puede sufrir modificaciones. Estamos haciendo un trabajo programado y coordinado para lograr la aprobación de esta ley, pero es un camino largo que debemos recoger y que, apenas, estamos iniciando”.

“Lo más importante es el apoyo que los mismos venezolanos le demos a esta propuesta. En Estados Unidos hay un aproximado de 250 mil venezolanos y si cada uno de ellos convence a 10 personas de respaldar este proyecto, ya estaríamos hablando de 2 millones y medio de personas en suelo estadounidense, a favor de la defensa de los derechos humanos de los venezolanos”, manifestó Ackerman.

… Y QUE DICEN LOS VENEZOLANOS EN MIAMI

Sonia Osorio
Sonia Osorio

Sonia Osorio es una periodista venezolana que llegó hace 18 años a Estados Unidos y ve esta propuesta desde la perspectiva de la prudencia y la cautela. “Todo proyecto de ley que ayude a mis compatriotas es una buena iniciativa, pero hay que dejar muy claro que no ha sido aprobado y por ende, no es un beneficio vigente”.

“Yo conozco personas que se me han acercado a preguntarme: dónde puedo meter los papeles? Esos venezolanos desesperados son susceptibles a ser víctimas de personas inescrupulosas que les ofrezcan legalizar su situación migratoria, amparándose en una ley que no ha sido aprobada y esto sería muy lamentable”.

Antonia Arias
Antonia Arias

Antonia Arias es médico radiólogo y tras jubilarse, se radicó en Miami hace tres años. Considera que esta ley viene a rescatar los derechos humanos de quienes están experimentando la tristeza de haber nacido en un gran país, que en sus años de gloria le dio cobijo a miles de emigrantes europeos, colombianos y cubanos y ahora está en ruinas.

“Realmente, la única duda que tengo con respecto a esta ley es la fecha límite de este beneficio. Hoy en día, que estamos casi a finales del 2015, la situación es aún más dura que en años anteriores, el acoso político, la corrupción y la violación a los derechos humanos es un mal que siguen viviendo los venezolanos que están en nuestro país”.

Gaby DíazEsta opinión es compartida por Gaby Díaz, administradora de contratos en el área de bienes raíces, quien tiene 15 años viviendo en Estados Unidos. “Estoy de acuerdo en que los venezolanos que hayan emigrado a este país se vean beneficiados por alguna ley que los proteja de una nación que no respeta los derechos humanos de sus ciudadanos. Lo importante es que la ley regule la situación migratoria de esas personas, bien sea a través de residencia permanente o de un estatus de protección temporal y puedan tener una nueva oportunidad para rehacer sus vidas”.

“Sin embargo, no tengo claro por qué la ley propuesta solo beneficia a los venezolanos que llegaron a este país antes del 1ero. de enero del 2013, cuando la crisis económica, política y social se ha visto incrementada, precisamente, en los últimos dos años desde que Nicolás Maduro asumió la presidencia de Venezuela”, manifestó, a la vez que agregó que, “definitivamente los venezolanos seguimos de cerca esta nueva propuesta y esperamos que sea aprobada pronto”.

Wahbi Tahhan
Wahbi Tahhan

Wahbi Tahhan, quien es agente de real estate y tiene cinco años viviendo en Miami, considera que este proyecto tiene dos vertientes que deben ser analizadas. “Me parece que, de ser aprobada, esta ley ayudaría a muchos venezolanos que no han podido solventar su situación migratoria por dificultades económicas y ese aspecto es completamente positivo”.

“Pero me preocupa que no vayan a ser evaluados los casos individuales para otorgar este beneficio. No basta con no tener antecedentes penales para optar a un estatus legal en esta nación, también hay que respetar su cultura y forma de vida, ya que, lamentablemente, hay muchos compatriotas que están aquí pretendiendo que el país se adapte a ellos en lugar de adaptarse ellos a las leyes de Estados Unidos. Esto lo podemos ver en un ejemplo tan simple, como el tráfico en Doral, donde los abusos de los que venimos huyendo han empezado a evidenciarse. Creo que esta ley debe amparar a los venezolanos que están aquí tratando de reconstruir su vida con dignidad y respeto”.

Jacqueline DaConceicao
Jacqueline DaConceicao

Jacqueline DaConceicao, quien es administradora y reside en Miami desde hace cuatro años, también ve con prudencia la aplicación de este recurso. “Yo creo que hay que evaluar los casos individuales de cada venezolano que aspire a beneficiarse con esta ley porque, definitivamente, no podemos permitir que las violaciones a las leyes que se cometen en nuestro país, ahora se implementen en una nación que nos ha dado un nuevo cobijo”.

“Yo apoyo la inmigración legal de venezolanos a la Florida, pero es importante considerar sus verdaderas intenciones para desarrollar una vida honesta y respetable. Lógicamente, hay que beneficiar al venezolano que viene a trabajar y a buscar un buen futuro, pero no a aquel que pretenda exportar las costumbres y los vicios que acabaron con Venezuela”.

Elias Kasabdji
Elias Kasabdji

Elías Kasabdji, un comerciante venezolano que lleva seis años viviendo en Miami, pero no ha dejado de verse afectado con la realidad venezolana, pues viaja frecuentemente a su país, manifestó su apoyo contundente a este propuesta de ley. “Esta sería una ventana para quienes han tenido que escapar de la crisis que vive nuestros país y no tienen alternativas legales para estar aquí”.

“Por un lado, beneficiaría a muchos compatriotas que fueron secuestrados, amenazados y hasta han sufrido la pérdida de seres queridos a conseguir un estatus migratorio en Estados Unidos y aun no lo logran, a pesar de tener suficientes recursos económicos. Por otro lado, también ayudaría a quienes salieron Venezuela en busca de un futuro digno y no tienen el dinero requerido para iniciar un proceso migratorio legal”.

Blanca Lindo
Blanca Lindo

“En Venezuela no se puede vivir”. Con estas contundentes palabras, Blanca Lindo, comerciante venezolana con tres años viviendo en Miami, manifiesta su apoyo a la Ley de Asistencia a Refugiados Venezolanos, a la cual considera una forma de amparar y proteger la vida de quienes tuvieron que huir de su país natal. “Los venezolanos que salimos de nuestro país no lo hicimos por elección, lo hicimos obligados por la situación precaria que desde hace años atraviesa Venezuela. Tenemos derecho a una nueva oportunidad y darle una vida y un futuro mejor a nuestros hijos, quienes también tienen derecho a crecer como profesionales y como personas de bien”.

Norah Lossada
Norah Lossada

Norah Lossada es publicista y tiene 16 años viviendo en Estados Unidos. Para ella en Venezuela no hay ley, ni derechos humanos. Se refirió específicamente a los casos de deportación aseverando que “me parece un crimen mandar a alguien de regreso a Venezuela, porque nuestro país, ya no es país es un lugar sin libertades ni respeto”.

“Estos mal llamados gobiernos han hecho lo que les da la gana con nuestro país y nos han obligado a salir de él, así que me parece más que justo, iniciar un proceso que les de legalidad a las miles de personas que están aquí en un condición irregular y que, de poder solventar su situación migratoria, tendrían mucho que aportar a Estados Unidos”.

Antonio Malave
Antonio Malave

Antonio Malavé es gerente financiero, tiene cinco años viviendo en Miami y también apoya rotundamente esta propuesta de ley, “es que en Venezuela no se puede vivir. Yo soy venezolano, mi familia es venezolana y ahora estoy aquí porque queremos vivir dignamente, así como lo aspiran muchas personas que no han logrado solventar su situación migratoria”.

“La realidad venezolana es insostenible, social, política y hasta económicamente, pues el valor del dólar con respecto al bolivar ha alcanzado niveles tan altos e indetenibles que es imposible sostener un sistema financiero estable en Venezuela y las víctimas directas son los ciudadanos que, ante falta de alternativas, no tienen más opción que huir de su lugar de origen”.

Luis-Riquezes
Luis-Riquezes

Luis Riquezes lleva 16 años en Miami, donde se desempaña como director de construcción de varios proyectos inmobiliarios y a pesar de lamentar la situación que atraviesan sus compatriotas, ve esta propuesta con mucha cautela. “Habría que evaluar muy detalladamente a quién vamos legalizar”.

“Es cierto que hay miles de venezolanos ilegales en Estados Unidos tratando de buscar una nueva oportunidad de vida, pero también es cierto que hay mucho “vivaracho”, como decimos en Venezuela, que van a ver en esta ley una oportunidad para solventar su situación migratoria, sin estar dispuestos a adaptarse al sistema de vida y leyes de esta nación. Creo que hay que tener mucho cuidado con eso”.

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Send this to a friend